Our Blog

List of recently published project topics and materials

PROJECT TOPIC- HOW TO DEVELOP BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY OF A RESEARCH PROJECT WRITING

PROJECT TOPIC- HOW TO DEVELOP BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY OF A RESEARCH PROJECT WRITING

 

INTRODUCTION

A well-written introduction is the most efficient way to hook your reader and set the context of your proposed research. Get your reader’s attention early on and do not waste space with obvious and general statements. The introduction is your opportunity to demonstrate that your research has not been done before and that the proposed project will really add something new to the existing body of literature. Your proposal does not have to be worthy of a Nobel prize but it has to be based on sound hypotheses and reasoning.

You should provide background information in the form of a literature review which sets the context for your research to help the reader understand the questions and objectives. You will also be expected to show that you have a good knowledge of the body of literature, the wider context in which your research belongs and that you have awareness of methodologies, theories and conflicting evidence in your chosen field. Research proposals have a limit on words or pages so you won’t be able to analyse the whole existing body of literature.

Choose key research papers or public documents and explain clearly how your research will either fill a gap, complete or follow on from previous research even if it is a relatively new field or if you are applying a known methodology to a different field. Journal articles, books, PhD theses, public policies, government and learned society reports are better than non-peer-reviewed information you may find on the internet. The University’s Library hosts online guidance on getting started with researching, managing your sources, and practical information on finding what you need in search engines.

Although you will develop your ideas further in the main body of the text, your introduction may also include a short summary of your aims and objectives, your methodology and the expected outcomes/benefits of your research as well as who it will benefit and who will be able to use it.

Before you start, please make sure once again that you understand the purpose of doctoral research: It is about completing a research project independently and making new findings available to the international research community. Research is always problem orientated. It is NOT about writing a book on a comprehensive topic compiling all available information, and it is NOT about advocating your (political) opinions. These two misunderstandings are common in social sciences.

PROJECT TOPIC- HOW TO DEVELOP BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY OF A RESEARCH PROJECT WRITING

Getting Started 

Begin by brainstorming topics, collecting information, taking a lot of notes, and asking a lot of questions. Keep your notes and sources organized as you go. This data gathering process makes the actual writing much easier. When developing your topic, look for patterns and relationships. See what conclusions you can draw. Try discussing your ideas with classmates or your teacher. A new perspective can help shake up your thinking, and keep your momentum going.

Organize Your Writing

Develop an outline to help you stay on track as you write, identifying your main points and what you want to conclude. Keep in mind basic essay and paper structure: The introduction should give your reader an idea of the essay’s intent, including a basic statement of what the essay will discuss. The body presents the evidence that supports your idea. Use concrete examples whenever and avoid generalities. The conclusion should summarize and make sense of the evidence you presented in the body.

The Rough Draft 

You may find as you write that you end up with a different idea than the one you began with. If your first topic or conclusion doesn’t hold water, be open to changing it. If necessary, re-write your outline to get yourself back on track.

TIPS: Leave enough time to show your draft to others — use the writing center, if possible. A fresh perspective can help you polish your paper, and catch inconsistencies and mistakes. Describe a problem that is about the same size as your solution. Don’t draw a dark picture of nuclear war, teen suicide and lethal air pollution if you are planning a modest neighborhood arts program for children. Don’t describe the absence of your project as the problem. “We don’t have enough beds in our battered women’s shelter” is not the problem. The problem is increased levels of domestic violence. More shelter beds is a solution. Become familiar with the vocabulary of your subject. For example, when writing about fiction, drama, and poetry, critical writers use words such as: syntax, tone, attitude, voice, speaker, and thesis.

 Refine and Proofread

When you’re done, take a break so you can come back to your writing with fresh eyes. Ask yourself: Is the writing clear? Do the ideas make sense? Are all of my requirements fulfilled?  Did I avoid repetition? Have I used proper grammar and spelling? How does it sound read out loud? Remember the title and first paragraph are going to form a strong impression in the mind of the reviewer.

Facts must lead logically and inevitably to the conclusion and/or the solution presented. Remember that proposal reviewers may come from a variety of disciplines and may not be familiar with your field of study. Reviewers may also have to compare proposals across disciplines and methodological lines. Keep this in mind when writing. Proposals should be directed toward a general audience (unless otherwise specified) and avoid excessive use of jargon!

PROJECT TOPIC- HOW TO DEVELOP BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY OF A RESEARCH PROJECT WRITING

Was the material helpful? Comment below. Need the material? Call 08060755653.